YOU DON'T SAY!

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'TROOP' REHEARSAL 1895-STYLE.

Postby johngleeson » Sat Jun 01, 2013 2:02 pm

'TROOP' REHEARSAL 1895-STYLE.


Correct me if I'm wrong...but I believe today (June 1st) is the first 2013 'Troop' rehearsal. I would hope it all goes off better for the present massed bands than it did for their musical ancestors of 1895...as I unearthed this report from the 'Sheffield Independent' of 22nd May 1895:


LONDON.

The full dress-rehearsal of the Trooping of the Colour on the Horse Guards Parade this morning was far more instructive and interesting, and also amusing, than the stiff pipeclay ceremonial to be observed on Saturday next. Lord Methuen insisted on having everything carried out to the letter, and he repeatedly made the troops go through the movements again. This reached a climax when Dan Godfrey and the whole massed bands of the Guards were sent back to improve their march - Lieutenant Dan obeyed with an air that imperfectly concealed his disgust. Lord Methuen seemed to be in a mood for giving a good wigging all round. Lord Rosebery watched the scene from his library window, after the manner of Lord Beaconsfield. Mr. Gladstone and Lord Salisbury when they were Premiers never took the slightest notice of the show.


Dan Godfrey left the Grenadier Guards' band in 1896....so this was (probably) his last 'Troop' after 40 years at the helm. Some of today's bands are probably commencing getting into a state of extreme refreshment in the Buckingham Arms on Petty France as I write this (unless Lord Methuen's present-day successor hasn't " sent them back to improve their march").


J.G.
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Re: YOU DON'T SAY!

Postby damstirpitz » Sat Jun 01, 2013 9:54 pm

Yes john

It was the first reh of the Troop today, taken as you will remember by the Major General and under the eagle eye of the Garrision Sgt Major, now Bill Mott who I now know quite well we have had a few pints together being a fellow Welshman.

I shall be there next week for the second reh taken this year by Prince Charles as Col of the Welsh Guards who whose Troop it is this year. I have been for many years now and as I watch step every step of those passed days, I think I managed 17, today I meet passed guardsmen who never took part in one Troop.

Its a lot easier to sit in the stands and watch then it was taking part, particularly on a very hot day, there seemed to be many of them then than today.

I always feel very proud as the majority of the vets around me were guardsmen and not musicians and we were and always will be I suppose 'odd balls' to the guardsmen, I know in may days I think they thought we came out of a box for guard mounting, alike Britains soldiers and then went back in our box.

On the subject of guards musicians I well remember of the Hotel jobs were did being referred as Bandsmen I always made a point of educating the hotel staff that wen were musicians not Bandsmen. I was for six years a Bandsmen but when I joined the guards in 1963 I became a musician and was proud of the upgrade. All staff band players were musicians and line regiment bandsmen. But still today we get called bandsmen, I put this down to ignorance.

On a different tack at the end of June and a book on the Dambuster raid in May 1943 I will have written since 1982 26 books which is strange but not bad for a former CG musician the RAF refers to the Army as 'Brown Jobs' I am today proud to be a 'Brown Job' but also proud to have written so much about the young men of Bomber Command in WWII.

Alan Cooper
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'THE RAILWAY CHILDREN' - BAND STYLE (1845).

Postby johngleeson » Fri Jun 07, 2013 2:30 pm

' THE RAILWAY CHILDREN ' (OF THE REGIMENT) 1845.


Alan....chin up...I'll keep plugging away with these snippets of Coldstream band history until someone else takes up the baton...and somebody must be looking in on the site as this topic alone has had nearly 200,000 ' views '.


The above heading pays homage to the famous E. Nesbit story....but in this instance this is a factual tale involving the Coldstream musicians of 1845. BBC historian Dan Snow appeared on the goggle-box the other night in a programme chronicling the advent of 'Railway Mania' that gripped the nation in the 1840's. I did a bit of digging and found a newspaper article that linked our band to this transport craze, and it took the form of a description of the inaugural journey taken by some 300 Directors of the Eastern Counties Railway Company on the occasion of the inspection of the line from London to Norwich before its opening to the public. Some of the areas passed through will still be known to anyone who journeys on this line today. Here's the piece, taken from the 'Morning Post' of 2nd August 1845:


The Directors of the Eastern Counties and the Norwich and Brandon Railway Companies invited a large body of their friends to accompany them, yesterday, on an inspection of the lines, previously to opening the railway to the public from London to Norwich. Accordingly, at eight o'clock, about 300 gentlemen assembled in the board-room, where breakfast was provided for them, after partaking of which they entered the carriages specially provided for the occasion. The train consisted of 16 first-class carriages, containing 48 compartments, each carriage being surmounted with a flag. The whole was propelled by two powerful engines. The Band of the Coldstream Guards was in attendance, and accompanied the train in open carriages. At ten minutes to nine the signal to start was given, the band struck up the National Anthem, and amid the loud shouts of the spectators the train left the station.


(And so... we have got the band of Her Majesty's Coldstream Guards...herded into open carriages ....in full uniform....playing al fresco airs as the double-engined train left Shoreditch Station heading north-east....then the journey began):


Traversing slowly the line which at first runs as it were over the houses and streets in the suburbs, the engines gradually increased their power, and the train soon darted forth across the verdant heads and waving corn fields of Essex. The morning was all that could be wished for such an excursion, and the country and the crops were consequently seen to their best advantage. Near Stratford some of the corn was already cut, and much more seemed ripe for the sickle, and to promise the owner a good harvest. At the several stations at Stratford, Lea Bridge, Tottenham, Marsh Lane, Edmomton, Ponder's End, and Waltham, groups of spectators, many of whom were ladies, assembled and greeted the train with hearty cheers and vehement wavings of handkerchiefs. At Broxboune some delay took place to allow the swift train to pass, (which it did at the rate of some 50 miles an hour) and to take up some of the Directors who reside in that neighbourhood. At Bishop's Stortford, the furthest point on the line hitherto opened to the public, another pause ensued, and the passengers got out for a few minutes while the band drew up at the station and played some favourite pieces. Here a great crowd of persons, increased by the arrival of a previous train, was assembled, and these also gave a hearty welcome to their visitors. Amid the hearty cheers and the merry strains of the musicians, there were heard, however, one note which sounded lamentation. It was the bugle of the solitary coach from this station to Cambridge, then performing its journey for the last time, and which thus compelled its exterminating rival to listen to its requiem.


(I don't think there are too many verdant cornfields around Stratford these days. The last passage chronicled the exact moment in time of the passing of the stagecoach along that particular route, never to be seen again....then):


But, remorselessly, the latter soon dashed on, passing Stanstead, Elsenham, and Newport, with its fine old church and handsome tower; Shortgrove, with its antique mansions, once, so tradition runs, the resting-place of the "Merry Monarch" and "Mistress Eleanor Gwyn," on their visits to Newmarket. Audley End, the beautiful seat of Lord Braybrooke. At Wenden station flags were displayed, and a formidable battery of cannon was arranged on the embankment, as if with the most belligerent intention, but instead of resisting the intruders into their quiet district, who came in such a monstrous and unwonted shape, they fired a grand salute and bade them welcome.
At Wendon a local band, doubtless that which on Sundays charms in the parish church, was also drawn up here to do them honour, and the Coldstream kept politely silent, while their brethren, with no mean skill, piped and blew their utmost. Leaving Wendon the train rushed into the tunnel, and when all were involved in the thickest darkness, the Coldstream Band struck up and blended their notes with the roar of the engines and the reverberations of the tunnel, thereby making such horrible discord that a nervous passenger might have fancied himself in Tartarus and surrounded by legions of howling spirits who resented the intrusion.


(That last passage notes the courtesy paid by our band to a local musical outfit when the train arrived at Wendon. Most of these locals, though not far from London, would never have seen or heard a Guards' band before...so I wonder what they made of our band? This section of the article also bears witness to the Coldstream band playing in open carriages behind two smoking locomotives as they went through a lengthy tunnel....what state the band's uniforms (and lungs) were in after this fume-filled performance the paper didn't disclose....then):


But the fancy could have been but temporary, for the train soon emerged again into the light of day. Passing Chesterford and Whittlesford, where similar demonstrations, flags, cannons, &c., were prepared, at twenty-five minutes to twelve the train arrived at the chaste and elegant station at Cambridge. The Royal Standard floated magnificently amidst some twenty other flags, and streamers of various colours and devices, which were erected on the station roof, and on the platform. Here again the cannon fired salutes, and the Coldstream Band heightened, with their choicest strains, the general gaiety. This was, however, momentarily interrupted by an accident, caused by an explosion from one of the cannons, by which one person had his hand cut, but not seriously.
The train arrived at Ely, its place of destination, at seventeen minutes past twelve, and in about half an hour was joined by the train from Norwich, which had left that city at about half past ten; it consisted of five carriages and 150 passengers, and was received by loud plaudits by the assembled multitude.


(The train, with the band, then returned to Cambridge station....and):


A handsome marquee, capable of containing 600 persons, was erected in the station-yard, by Mr. Edgington, of London. The cuisine was entrusted to Messrs. Gunter, her Majesty's confectioners, and the tables were arranged with exquisite taste, and displayed an immense amount of plate. Hundreds, if not thousands, had the opportunity, and availed themselves of it, of witnessing the sight; entering at one end and departing at the other extremity of the booth.


(The Eastern Counties Railway Company weren't finished with the band though....as the Directors sat down to a banquet fit for a queen...):


The Band of the Coldstream Guards played during the dinner the following airs, under the direction of Mr. C. Godfrey, the band-master:

Overture - "Zampa"...Herold.

Aria - "Casta Diva," Norma...Bellini.

Quadrille - "The Gondoliers"...Muzard.

Fantasia - "Les Franeurs Di"...Auber.

Waltz - "A Deux Temps"...Jullien.

Glee - "Blow, gentle gales"...Sir H. Bishop.

Quadrille - "Semiramide"...Jullien.

Cavatina - "A te Diro"...Donizetti.

Waltz - "Die Elfen"...Labitzky.

Air e Coro - "Tutto e Sciotto"...Bellini.

A Spanish Chaunt.

Waltz - "Deuthe Lust"...Strauss.

Selection from - "Alma"...Costa.

"Railroad Galop"...Gungl.


(What state the band was in after that little lot I don't know. Either way the band went through the same process in reverse in open carriages tooting away between Cambridge and the Shoreditch Station terminus. The final chapter of " The Railway Children (of the Regiment)" went like this):


The principal part of the company then left the table; some evidently with deep regret, as they cast many a lingering, wistful look behind - a few returning to take one glass more of sparkling wine, ere the train started. The cannons again roared, the band struck up an enlivening air - the train moved on amid reiterated cheers and waving of handkerchiefs; and thus, so far as Cambridge was concerned, terminated the epoch of the opening of the Eastern Counties Line - a day to remember for ever.


So ends this old Coldstream band adventure. I would imagine the band resembled seasoned London chimney sweeps after sitting behind two early steam locos for the best part of twelve hours. This piece of 'Railway Mania' history featuring the band has laid undiscovered for the best part of 170 years....till now.


J.G.
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BAND CRICKET MATCH (1838).

Postby johngleeson » Mon Jun 10, 2013 2:32 pm

BAND CRICKET MATCH (1838).


I see that the cricket season is well and truly underway. With an " Ashes " series impending...I well remember Kevin Prestwich and Co. signing out all that regimental cricket gear and then decamping to Clapham Common to play a scratch match against whoever happened to be there. It seems the band enthusiasm for the game is a thing of antiquity...given this report I unearthed in the ' Berkshire Chronicle ' of 1st September 1838. The match was against the band of the Royal Horse Guards, and must have taken place due to both bands being on duty at Windsor for Queen Victoria. Here's the short report (and result):


WINDSOR AND ETON.

A match of cricket was played on Monday and Tuesday by the bands of the Royal Horse Guards (Blue) and Coldstream Foot Guards, which terminated in favour of the Coldstream beating their antagonists by 25 runs.


I wonder if Godfrey bowled a wicked googly?....and was Henry Lazarus as good at 2nd slip as he was on the clarionet? I certainly wouldn't have wanted to face that 6 foot 10 inch Turkish Music percussionist charging down the wicket launching a 90mph Yorker from a height approaching 11 feet. No face guards then or tallywhacker and saddlebag protectors...so if you got hit in the kisser your playing days would be numbered and your devil's bagpipes would have ached for days. Either way I think K.P. would have been proud of his band cricketing ancestors. Perhaps the losers ceremonially cremated a serpent and put the ashes in an urn to present to our band as a trophy after that two day match; or (more likely)...both bands repaired to the nearest Windsor hostelry to commence quaffing the foaming hop (like we used to do at that rather fine Young's pub the Windmill on the Common at Clapham Common, with K.P., Roger Phillips & Co.).


J.G.
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GUARD MOUNTING 1832-STYLE.

Postby johngleeson » Tue Jun 11, 2013 12:57 pm

GUARD MOUNTING 1832-STYLE.


Just be thankful we didn't have to contend with this type of occurrence when undertaking a Guard Mount. Here's the short report, taken from the 'Hampshire Advertiser' of Saturday 7th April 1832:


SERIOUS ACCIDENT NEAR ST. JAMES'S PALACE. - On Monday morning a bull, in a most infuriatic state, galloped down Pall Mall, followed by a number of persons calling out " mad bull." At this time a large concourse of people, who had been hearing the band of the Coldstream Guards playing before the Palace, were coming out of the Palace-yard. It was quite impossible for them to get out of the way of the animal, and the scene of confusion that occurred would baffle all description. The screams of women and children were dreadful, and the bull rushed among the crowd and tossed several persons into the air. One old man, who keeps an orange-stall near the Palace, was very seriously hurt. The bull made a rush at him, but fortunately the horns of the animal only caught his coat, and he was dragged along the street for several yards. One boy was tossed against a lamp-post with great violence, and a little girl who was passing at the time was nearly killed; several other persons were severely gored by the animal. Many persons were knocked down by the rush of the crowd and trampled upon, and very seriously injured. The bull at last ran into Cleveland-row. After the lapse of about an hour, a rope was lowered from Lord Durham's wall, and after a considerable time it was got around the bull's neck, and he was fastened to an iron-railing, where he was quickly killed.


Never a dull moment for the Coldstream band of that era...what with cricket matches, the St. James's version of the Pamplona bull run, and a makeshift slaughterhouse adjacent to some iron railings in Cleveland Row. The next time you are in Pall Mall try to imagine the above scene played out with the band in attendance some 180 years ago.


J.G.
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A.J. PHASEY SELLING AN EARLY EUPH? (1857).

Postby johngleeson » Tue Jun 11, 2013 4:12 pm

A.J. PHASEY SELLING AN EARLY EUPH? (1857).


I found this advertisement placed in " The Era " (London) dated 4th January 1857. Given the seller's details and the address, I (think) that this ad records a description of one of Alfred James Phasey's early euphoniums. Here's the ad:


TO MUSICIANS - EUPHONION FOR SALE.

Nearly new. Stands in C, with B flat slide.

Four improved Rotary Valves, and beautifully mounted in G. Silver.

A bargain. Lowest Price, £5 Cash. Can be forwarded.

Address, A.Z. 53 Admiral-terrace, Pimlico.


Admiral Terrace, Pimlico was a terrace row of houses that fronted Vauxhall Bridge Road, and had numerous Guards' band musicians living there. The " A.Z. " part may be his nom-de-plume for " Phasey " (I'm guessing), and seeing it doesn't mention a particular instrument maker (which is unusual), could this mean it was one of his own creation? If this is A.J.P's advert it reveals what the early configuration of his own euphonium's design was (rotary valves et all) when he was still serving in the Coldstream Guards' band...not what you would have thought for the 1850's. At five quid it was indeed a " bargain "...as what would a silver-gilt 1857 rotary valve Phasey euph be worth today?


J.G.
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CORONATION ANNIVERSARIES.

Postby johngleeson » Wed Jun 12, 2013 3:49 pm

CORONATION ANNIVERSARIES.


Much has been made lately of the 60th anniversary of the Coronation ceremony at Westminster Abbey for Queen Elizabeth II. Once again the BBC dug up a Dimbleby and made a programme in which various participants in the '53 ceremony recalled their part in it all. Boy choristers were now old gits like us lot...and one of the Maids of Honour (Lady Cholmondley Featherstonehaugh Majoribanks Farquharson) talked of the " pressure " of it all (although I wouldn't have thought that just clutching onto a length of Royal train constituted too much pressure). What wasn't mentioned though (typical) was the " pressure " the Kneller Hall Trumpeters must have been under belting out all those fanfares etc during the ceremony (no place to hide doing that, me thinks). It has to be said they did a fine job of it all...it still sounds impressive today.
As coincidence would have it I found a long-lost article recalling the celebration of the Coronation of King William IV and Queen Adelaide in 1831. This celebration was, though, given in All Saints Church, Derby....and it too had brass instruments accompanying the church organ. There the similarities end though. I recall that the late, great Kevin Prestwich was something of a fan of the G trombone....well... he should have been at old King Bill's celebration some 182 years ago...as this is what was played there. Forget the Bliss arrangement of the National Anthem....and try to imagine what this version sounded like in All Saints Church...as found in the 'Derby Mercury' of 14th September 1831:


CELEBRATION OF THE CORONATION.

DERBY. - The Coronation of their Majesties King William the IV and Queen Adelaide, was celebrated in this Borough on Thursday.


(Later):


At the close of the discourse, "Handel's Coronation Anthem " was given; and after the Blessing, the " National Anthem," the Choir and Organ taking the first strain, and each repeat were joined by the Congregation, supported by upwards of twenty brass instruments, the Solos introducing it, being taken up and down by five Bass Trombones and two Ophicleides. The music gave the greatest satisfaction, particularly the National Anthem, probably owing to the very novel accompaniment.


If I didn't know any better I would have catalogued this musical work as: National Anthem in G (with plenty of G) Arr. Prestwich. Opus I. If it could be found then perhaps the five bass trombonists of the Foot Guards' bands of 2013 could, with two tubas, resurrect this long-forgotten version of the N.A. in time to celebrate the 182nd anniversary of its performance premiere at Derby in 1831 in September!


J.G.
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CYFARTHFA BAND AND THE COLDSTREAM (1854).

Postby johngleeson » Thu Jun 13, 2013 1:32 pm

johngleeson wrote:
PeterBale wrote:
johngleeson wrote:A UNIQUE 'BRASS BAND'..BUT WAS IT BRITAIN'S FIRST? (1832).

(I wonder if it was indeed the first 'total' brass band in this country?Any forum members who knows their brass band history...over to you).

J.G.


Historical details can be difficult to track down, but it certainly must have been one of the first all-brass combinations. Trevor Herbert, in his "The brass band movement in the 19th & 20th centuries" refers to all-brass bands being in existence "from the 1830's". One of the earliest, the Cyfarthfa Band from Merthyr Tydfil, was founded in 1838, and it was in 1844 that the Distin family were featured in a London concert playing their newly-acquired saxhorns..



Pete...mention of the Cyfarthfa Band jogged my memory as to where i'd seen a post on C.G. French horn player Ralph Livesey (as noted on this page,post 5).
It seems that Ralph Livesey was the younger son of Cyfarthfa Band's leader,Ralph Livesey Snr.In one article (also penned by Trevor Herbert)..it states:"...another (Ralph) was French horn soloist with the Coldstream Guards,and was also a member of the Italian Opera and the Lyceum Orchestra."


J.G.



CYFARTHFA BAND AND THE COLDSTREAM (1854).


The above reply on page 85 of this topic by Pete Bale noted the Cyfarthfa Brass Band, an early contender for being the first virtuosic brass band in the country, if not the world. Formed by Robert Thompson Crawshay (as virtually his own private band), the owner of the Cyfarthfa Iron Works at Merthyr 30 miles north of Cardiff, by the 1840's this band boasted many London professional musicians in the principals' seats, together with local talent filling the 'rank and file' chairs. Such was Crawshay's wealth this band was all but in name a professional outfit, and even boasted its own full-time music arranger. As noted above the conductor of this band was one Ralph Livesey senior, who's son (also Ralph) joined the Coldstream Guards' band on French horn in the mid-19th century. I've unearthed an old newspaper article that probably reveals the exact moment in time that the Livesey's and Coldstream band's paths crossed. The piece also confirms that our band was utilising the burgeoning national railway network to access once remote-from-London locations as far back as 1854...and in doing so it discloses that both Coldstream and Cyfarthfa bands shared a stage in Merthyr at around the time of the Crimean War. Here's the find, as broadcast in the 'Hereford Times' of 20th May 1854:


GRAND CONCERT AT CYFARTHFA, FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE WIVES AND FAMILIES OF THE SOLDIERS SENT TO THE EAST.

A concert took place on Monday evening last, in the large room, Cyfarthfa, under the special and distinguished patronage of Robert Thompson Crawshay Esq. of Cyfarthfa Castle, and was in every respect worthy of the Crawshays. The concert had been the all-absorbing topic of conversation in the town and surrounding district for the previous fortnight, and the large room presented such a phalanx of rank and fashion, not only from this town, but from Dowlais, Rhymney, Tredegar, Pont-y-pridd, Treforest, Cardiff, Aberdare, Hirwain, Neath, Swansea, and Brecon, as can hardly ever have been seen attending a provincial concert, thus proving that the elite in those towns felt for the wives and families of our brave soldiers. The Directors of the Vale of Neath Railway most handsomely provided a special train for the occasion, and had the Directors of the Taff-Vale done the same, we have no doubt that many more would have attended from the South. However the Coldstream Guards were conveyed gratis by this line, and the Vale of Neath offered to do the same. The room, has might have been expected, was fitted up in the most comfortable manner, for the numerous visitors present, and there were not less than 500 wax candles lighted at the same time, producing a most brilliant light. The orchestra was at the west end of the room, which was decorated with flags and banners. Miss Henderson, the Band of the Coldstream Guards, &c., arrived by the mid-day train, and were conveyed at once to the Castle. Many of the visitors were waiting at the doors by 7 o'clock. The doors were opened at half-past, and the performance commenced precisely at eight. The following is the programme:

PART FIRST.

Overture...Zampa...Herold.

Aria...La Figla der Regiment - Miss Clara Henderson...Donizetti.

Selection...Le Prophete...Meyerbeer.

Fantasia, Piano...Mr. E.H. Thorne....Mendelssohn.

Polka (encore)...Gazelle: Cornet Obbligato Mr. Phillipps....D. Godfrey.

Song (encore)...The Mocking Bird - Miss Henderson, Flute Obbligato Mr. Hall...Sir H.R. Bishop.

Fantasia...Ne Touchez pas a la Reine...Boisselot.

Grand Coronation March...Le Prophete - by the Coldstream and Cyfarthfa Bands...Meyerbeer.


PART SECOND.


Wedding March...A Midsummer Night's Dream...Mendelssohn.

Overture...Der Freischutz...Weber.

Cavatina...Una Voce...Miss Henderson...Rossini.

Valse...Queen Mab....J.G. Callcott.

Welsh Air (encore)...Glan Meddwdod Mwyn - Cyfarthfa Band.

Grand Fantasia..Robert le Diable - Solos for Clarionet, Cornet, Euphonium, and Trombone - Messrs. Pollard, Phillipps, Phasey and Hawkes....Meyerbeer.

Song (encore) Whistle, and I'll come to thee, my lad...Miss Henderson.

Solo...Violoncello...Mr. Thomas Thorne....Thorne.

Aria...O rest in the Lord (Elijah)...Cornet Mr. Phillipps....Mendelssohn.

Quadrille of All Nations - By the Coldstream and Cyfarthfa Bands....Jullien.


The numerous audience departed about 11. We should state that 714 front seat tickets, at 4s. each, were issued, besides several hundred back seat ones, and £3 14s. 6d. in received cash. All present availed themselves of the opportunity of thus contributing towards the necessities of the families of our brave soldiers.


You can bet that this concert was where French horn player Ralph Livesey junior and the Coldstream band crossed paths. The Cyfarthfa Brass Band has passed virtually into brass band mythology and legend (much like the St. Hilda Colliery Band did some 70 years later). This undiscovered find has revealed that in 1854 it shared the stage with our band, a fact not known (I think) before.


J.G.
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MORE ON THE RAILWAY TO CAMBRIDGE (1845).

Postby johngleeson » Thu Jun 20, 2013 1:26 pm

MORE ON THAT COLDSTREAM BAND JOURNEY BY RAILWAY TO CAMBRIDGE (1845).


A bit further up this page (Post 3) was noted an early example of the band's association with the ever-expanding Victorian rail infrastructure of the 1840's. I found a sister article to the one already posted...and it reveals exactly where in the train the band was stationed in " open carriages ", together with the answer to my question as to what people made of a Guards' band on hearing one for the first time. Here's part of the find, as recorded in the 'Norfolk Chronicle' of 26th July 1845:


"The Cambridge station was beautifully decorated with hot-house plants, having the appearance of a large conservatory. The train [from London] arrived at eleven o'clock, and was received with the firing of cannon, and loud cheering. The band of the Coldstream Guards occupied an open carriage placed in the centre of the train, and played several beautiful airs on their arrival. Shortly after the arrival of the London party, the band of the Coldstream Guards took its station upon the platform; and " discoursed most exquisite music." So great was the attraction of this band, that it was with difficulty a passage could be obtained through the dense crowd collected to hear it.
During the interval which elapsed between the arrival of the trains, and the hour at which it was announced the collation would be ready - the visitants employed themselves either in listening to the band, in inspecting the works at the station, in roaming over the adjoining fields, or in strolling up to the town, the approach to which, from the station, is by an excellent road."


Given the other article stated that the train the band was on consisted of 16 first-class carriages....the band must have been between carriages eight and nine, in an open third-class " wagon." That was the first time that Cambridge would have heard a Guards' band in-person so to speak, and the novelty of it was such that it appears it caused the platforms to become clogged up with listeners.


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AN IN-PRINT ASSESSMENT OF THE BAND (1854).

Postby johngleeson » Thu Jun 20, 2013 1:50 pm

AN IN-PRINT ASSESSMENT OF THE BAND (1854).


Exactly what our band sounded like over 150 years ago can only be guessed at. The only way this can be attempted is by means of the printed description, but even these are, it seems, pretty thin on the ground. I have though found one such description. It turns up as part of a lengthy article chronicling the band's first appearance in Bradford in 1854. The band appeared there in a series of concerts given at St. George's Hall. The audiences were in excess of 4,000 for each concert, and the 'Leeds Intelligencer' of 18th March 1854 noted this with respect to our illustrious band ancestors:


"A single glance is sufficient to exhibit the character of the performers, and those who have had the pleasure of listening to the band of the Coldstream Guards in town may readily imagine what this selection became in their hands in Bradford. The instrumentation was magnificent. Nothing could exceed the delicacy with which the piano passages were interpreted, or the precision and effect with which the transitions were accomplished. The band seemed a curious and highly finished piece of mechanism, every movement of which was perfectly controlled by the baton of the conductor. In the solos, the subdued tone of the accompaniment, which was not performed by a single instrument, but by the whole band, was wonderful. Especially the solo performances by Mr. Pollard on the clarionet, and Mr. Phillips on the cornet, are to be noticed as gems of musical execution. The former, a young gentleman between 17 and 18 years of age, but one of the first performers in the kingdom upon his instrument, was most enthusiastically applauded, while Phillips's execution seemed magical.
The length of the concerts [three hours] was much increased by the absurd practice of encoring. At the first concert several demands of this kind were made by the denizens of the great gallery, and the conductor, Mr. Godfrey, being desirous of pleasing his new acquaintances, the concert was extended to midnight. While reprobating this instance of the " gods," we must not omit an equally ridiculous and offensive practice, in which the " better rank," as they esteem themselves, indulge; that of leaving their seats during the performance of the concluding piece, a proceeding which is always insulting to the performers, and which only shows the ignorance of those who indulge it. Both these objections were visible on Tuesday evening. It only remains to be added that the evening concerts were densely crowded, that everybody was pleased, and that the band of the Coldstream Guards have won golden opinions by their visit to Bradford.


That's about as close as we are going to get in regards to what the band of 1854 sounded like on the concert platform. The journalist gave William Pollard's age as '17 or 18'....but looking at the records he was born in 1833...and was 32 when he committed suicide in 1866...so he'd have actually been about 20 or 21 when he appeared at Bradford. With these provincial concerts lasting some four hours (inc. encores 8pm to midnight)...Mr. Godfrey and his boys certainly had staying power to add to their musical 'curious and highly-finished piece of mechanism'.


J.G.
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WHERE THE BAND GOT ITS STAYING POWER.

Postby johngleeson » Sat Jun 22, 2013 12:20 pm

WHERE THE BAND GOT ITS 'STAYING POWER' FROM (1840).


Over the previous pages of this topic we have noted the considerable 'staying power' that Mr. Godfrey and his band seemed to have in the Victorian era. From four hour long concerts to marching band duties that make you wince at the thought of them it seems that for the Guards' bands of the nineteenth century instruments were rarely in their cases. I think I have found one source for these marathon musicians....and they came from our former home the Duke of York's H.Q. King's Road Chelsea. As we know....many of ours (and other) Guards' band recruits from this era came from the Royal Military Asylum. With its own juvenile band aged between 7 and 14....these lads came ready-made for Mr. Godfrey & Co. when they were accepted into their respective bands. If proof of this were needed, look no further than this article printed in the 'Morning Post' of 18th October 1840:


THE DUKE OF YORK'S MILITARY SCHOOL. - Yesterday the boys belonging to the Military School founded by the late Duke of York at Chelsea obtained permission to have a holiday, in order to inspect the interior of St. Paul's Cathedral. In the afternoon they were marched from Chelsea with their colours and band into the City, in time for the evening service. A conductor was appointed to explain the various monuments erected to the memory of our celebrated military and naval heroes. On their departure the great western doors were thrown open, out of which they made their exit. On arriving upon the steps in front, they halted, when the colours were stationed by the statue of Queen Anne, and the space around was crowded with spectators. Here an interesting scene presented itself by the band playing several marches with great precision, and concluding with the National Anthem. They were then marched back to Chelsea.


Double Chelsea Guards were hard enough.....but a Double St. Paul's plus a St.Paul's Steps Concert ?....and that was a " holiday." Quite a few in the band of 7 to 14 year-olds that blew their way from the King's Road to Ludgate Hill would have later joined our band and the other Guards' bands. With schooling like that route march I would have imagined jaunts down the Mall would have been a piece of cake for those lads.

(I'll bet they didn't need rocking to sleep that night back at The Duke's).


J.G.
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PHASEY AND THE COLDSTREAM BAND.

Postby johngleeson » Thu Jun 27, 2013 3:56 pm

PHASEY AND THE COLDSTREAM BAND.


Most likely one of the more famous of ex-Coldstream band members, the name ' Phasey ' is linked generally to Alfred James Phasey (1834-1888), the inventor of the modern euphonium, and noted soloist with the band during the 1850's and 60's. After trawling through old newspapers however, it can now be revealed that this A.J. Phasey wasn't the only one that the band could boast of. It appears that for about three years his eldest son Alfred John Hall Phasey (b.1856) was also a member of the Coldstream Guards' band as an ophicleide player. His dates with the band were c.1872-75....and only appeared on my radar thanks to these two finds. The first appeared in 'The Era', and dated to the 25th August 1894. It was an extensive article on a dancing school founded by the said Phasey junior. Here's part of it:


AT A DANCING SCHOOL.

A visit to the Anglo-Italian Ballet School, Lambeth, one afternoon this week found Mr. Alfred Phasey, the founder and director thereof.


(Later):


Mr. Alfred Phasey, who is still a few years on the better - or, at any rate, the more agreeable - side of forty, is the son of a distinguished musician, and himself was trained to the career of music. The elder Phasey was euphonium player in the Coldstream Guards under the late Mr. Charles Godfrey, and was accounted the most accomplished performer on his instrument. At the age of sixteen Mr. Alfred Phasey joined the Coldstream Guards, the officers whereof raised a subscription to send him to the Kneller School of Music. Fourteen months later he returned to the regiment fully certificated. At the age of eighteen Mr. Phasey obtained an engagement as euphonium player at the Queen's Theatre, Long-acre, for Mr. Jules Riviere's season of promenade concerts, and subsequently deputised for his father with the Crystal Palace orchestra. At nineteen Mr. Phasey purchased his discharge from the Coldstream Guards, and became a member of the orchestra at the Canterbury Music Hall. Here he acquired distinction as a soloist on the cornet, trombone, euphonium and bombardon. In the autumn of 1879 Mr. Phasey went out to America, where he was a member of the late Patrick S. Gilmore's band, and of the Mapleson Italian Opera orchestra, under the direction of Signor Arditi. His performances on the antoniophone, and instrument curiously suggesting the human voice, gained him a considerable reputation, and he organised an antoniophone quartet, which enjoyed a great vogue. Meanwhile Mr. Phasey had met and married a lady trained as a dancer by Madame Louise and subsequently by Madame Lanner. In 1880 they opened the New York Training School for Stage Dancing, and put on the first ballet at Koster and Bial's Concert Garden. Mr. Phasey returned to England in 1887, on the invitation of Manns, to succeed his father as euphonium player in the Crystal Palace orchestra. Mr. Phasey was also by way of requiring a good connection as a trombone soloist, in the music halls; but he gave this up in order to assist Madame Phasey, who had meantime been appointed ballet mistress to Sir Augustus Harris, a position which she occupied for three seasons.
In the autumn of 1891 the Anglo-Italian Training School for Stage Dancing was founded at 106 York-road, Lambeth, with a nucleus of two pupils; but now Mr. Phasey looks upon a hundred as a proper compliment. In the autumn of 1892 Mr. Phasey took the conveniently appointed and spacious premises that he now occupies at 3 Lambeth Palace-road, and has meantime greatly extended his clientele among the theatrical managers in the provinces.


None of that was known to us before (I think). Given that our band boasted two world-class euph soloists in the early 1870's (Messrs. Bourne and Darnley)...I'm guessing that perhaps A.J.H. Phasey was on ophicleide player when with the band during his short time there.
There were quite a few ads noting Mr. P's 'Anglo-Italian' school at this period....so I wonder whether this circumstance resulted in a Phasey marital skeleton to emerge from his stage-school closet....as some two months' on from the above piece I unearthed this report in the 'London Standard' of 9th October 1894. Here's the start of it:


WESTMINSTER

MUSICIAN'S REAL WIFE SUES FOR MAINTENANCE AFTER 14 YEARS.

Alfred Phasey, formerly a member of the Coldstream Guards' band, and now said to be engaged in the orchestra of the Crystal Palace, and connected with the Anglo-Italian Ballet School, Lambeth Palace-road, was summoned for neglecting to maintain his wife. - Mr. A. Kent appeared for the Complainant: Mr. Purcell for the Defendant.
MR. KENT said the parties were married in 1878, and shortly afterwards the Defendant sold up the home (Complainant's), and with the proceeds went to America. The Complainant followed, but Defendant shortly afterwards sent her back to England, promising to follow her later. He did not do so, however, and the next Complainant heard was that her husband was living with another Madame Phasey.


The trial went on....and (to cut a long story short) Alfred Phasey was ordered to pay the (real, or first) Mrs. Phasey fifteen shillings a week for life (and 23s. court costs). It appears that Mr. P. junior flogged the marital abode and then went to America to join Gilmore's band. Is it no coincidence that in 1878 Patrick Gilmore and his band did a European tour....appearing on the 21st May 1878 at Crystal Palace. This is almost certainly where A.J.H. Phasey and Gilmore's paths crossed...its too much of a coincidence. He was probably recruited for this famous American band following this chance meeting....and in the coming months sold up his (or their) house and crossed The Pond. Looking at the two newspaper reports the timescales appear to match...it all seems to fit. I think that Alfred Phasey returned to America sometime in the early 1900's....as on one family site he's noted as dying in Pennsylvania.
Marital transgressor or not....there can't have been too many ex-band members that have gone on to open a stage-school....be it in New York or London....let alone having been a member in Patrick Gilmore's band.....but it appears A.J.H. Phasey was one who had.


J.G
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Re: THREE GENERATIONS OF COLDSTREAM MUSICIANS UPDATED.

Postby johngleeson » Sat Jul 20, 2013 10:19 am

johngleeson wrote:
johngleeson wrote:THREE GENERATIONS OF COLDSTREAM MUSICIANS UPDATED.


Thanks to an e-Mail received from a family member to me, we can now update the information on three generations of the Horne family, who, it seems, can now boast close to a century of service with the Coldstream Guards' band, commencing in the 1790's and ending in the 1880's.
An additional generation is supplied by James Horne senior. We had not noted his involvement with the band before, so here are his National Archive details :-


Royal Hospital Chelsea : Soldier's Service Documents WO97/179/67.

JAMES HORN alias JAMES HORNE. Born BELLIE, Banffshire. Served in 2nd Foot Guards; 1st Foot Regiment; Northern Fencibles. Discharged aged 53.

Date : 1816.


The families records show him to have been born circa 1761, rather than the 1763 the record shows. I checked the web and the 'Northern Fencibles' were raised by the Duke of Gordon, and were disbanded in 1783. So then James Horne must have joined the 1st Foot (Royal Scots), the oldest of all British regiments and senior regiment of the line. He must have then joined the Coldstream in the late 1790's, as by 1803 his son, James William Horne, had been born in St. Margaret's Parish, Westminster. Here are his N.A. records :-


Royal Hospital Chelsea : Soldier's Service Documents WO97/179/68.

JAMES HORN. Born ST. MARGARET'S, London and Middlesex. Served in 2nd Foot Guards. Discharged aged 47

Dates: 1811-1850.


As can be seen James Horn(e) joined the Coldstream band aged just 8 years old. I noted him as being a French horn player in Charles Godfrey's ' Surrey Gardens ' band in 1839. Given that he was a French horn player, there is a very high probability that his father was too.
James Horne senior left the Coldstream band in 1816, according to his family's history " a broken man." Quite a few Coldstream band members left in 1816 following the band's six month stay in Paris following Waterloo....could this have something to do with that family legend ?
Broken or not, he lived another 30 years, his death being recorded in St. Margaret's Parish, Westminster, in July, 1846, at the ripe old age of 85.
Back on page 124, post 2 of this topic is noted the census results for James William Horne. On this post I found out that his son, William Francis Horne, became the Coldstream principal oboe from the 1860's to the 1880's, and I noted that W.F. Horne had been placed in the Royal Military Asylum, and was shown there in the 1851 census aged 9. I assumed this to be the first instance thus found of a father sending his son there, but I was wrong. Thanks to the family's research, we can now reveal how William Francis Horne came to be in the R.M.A. James William Horne died in 1850. Here is his burial record :-


Burials in the Parish of St Mary, Lambeth, in the County of Surrey in the Year 1850.

Name: James William Horne.

Abode: 40 New Street, Vauxhall.

When Buried: October 6th, 1850.

Age: 47.


So that is why William Francis Horne was sent to the R.M.A. It also explains why, when he had descended from a family of French horn players, he ended up on the equally difficult-but-different instrument the oboe.
William Francis Horne served in the Coldstream band until the late 1880's. A death record exists for a William Francis Horne in Lambeth, 1910. This is more than likely him.
The above research therefore details a near-continuous family association with the Coldstream Guards' band stretching from the 1790's to the late 1880's....something of a record for longevity, as even the Godfreys could only manage 1813 to 1880.

It's a bit more band history duly filled in, though.


J.G.


MORE INFORMATION FOUND ON JAMES HORN SENIOR.


The above piece was posted back on page 135 of this topic, and it suggested that this family had given service to the Coldstream band from the 1790's on. Having tracked down James Horn seniors service record it reveals that he was one of the first British players to join the band when still led by C.F. Eley, as it seems he replaced one of the German musicians in 1789 when that poor lad died. Here are parts of his records :-


HIS MAJESTY'S COLDSTREAM REGIMENT OF FOOT GUARDS WHEREOF FIELD MARSHAL THE DUKE OF CAMBRIDGE IS COLONEL

JAMES HORN, Private, Born in the Parish of Bellie in the County of Banff was enlisted at the Age of Twenty Six; And hath served in the said Regiment for the space of 26 Years and 327 Days, as well as other Corps, after the Age of Eighteen.

DISCHARGED In consequence of : Having bad general health, the effects of Long Service & Age.

DESCRIPTION. JAMES HORN is 53 Years of Age, is 5 feet 8 inches in Height, Brown Hair, Grey Eyes, Fair Complexion, by Trade or Occupation a Musician.

STATEMENT OF SERVICE.

CORPS.

N. FENCIBLE REGIMENT : FROM : " NOT KNOWN."

1ST. FOOT : FROM 12TH MAY 1783 TO 17TH MAY 1789.

COLD'M GDS : 27TH JUNE 1789 TO 5TH NOVEMBER 1789.

COLD'M GDS : 26TH NOVEMBER 1789 TO 7TH JUNE 1816.

TOTAL SERVICE AFTER EIGHTEEN : 38 YEARS 22 DAYS.


As his name suggests.....he was a French horn player.....the German musician he replaced in the band was Johann Frederick Richter, who died on 3rd September 1789. He would probably have been too ill to be in the band before his death....so James Horn's joining the band in the June of 1789 seems to fit perfectly. I wonder what the small gap in service in the November of 1789 was all about ?


J.G.


UPDATE ON HORN(E) FAMILY AND THE COLDSTREAM BAND: FOUR GENERATIONS NOT THREE.


The above post was noted on page 130 of this topic....and revealed one particular family of Coldstream musicians who could boast long links with the band running into generations. I have had an update from a family descendant who has, following further research, discovered that the Horne family had four generations who served in the band, and not three as was previously supposed. The missing generation was Joseph Horne (born 1784), son of James Horne (born 1763). Joseph Horne would have been born when his father was a musician in the 1st Foot (Royal Scots)....and would have been about five years old when his father transferred to the Coldstream band, under C.F. Eley. He enlisted into the band in May 1801, and served with his father until 1815. Given his father was a French horn player...its almost certain Joseph was too...and both father and son would have travelled to France in the summer of 1815 post-Waterloo. James William Horne (born 1803) was Joseph's son...and William Francis Horn was James William's son. He left the band around the 1880-mark. I would doubt whether any other family could boast four generations serving in the band (Godfrey's included)....so that's some achievement to say the least.


J.G.
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THE BAND IN BRADFORD (1854).

Postby johngleeson » Sat Jul 20, 2013 11:02 am

THE BAND IN BRADFORD (1854).


As found in the 'Bradford Observer' of 31st August 1854, here's their music critic's assessment of the band....and with it the chronicling of the period in Yorkshire band history when these bands were discarding reed instruments in favour of an all-brass combination. Here's (part) of the piece:


COLDSTREAM GUARDS' BAND AT ST. GEORGE'S HALL.

On listening to the performances, two or three ideas struck us forcibly - first, the agreeable absence of the ophicleide, an instrument which never blends with anything else, and possesses in itself a tone far from agreeable. The absence was more than counterbalanced in the euphonium, both for power and quality; but secondly, we were more than ever led to regret the complete disuse of the serpent by our local bands. This instrument certainly has not been equalled in depth and mellowness by any of the recent inventions. True, nearly all our local bands have discarded clarionets, and other reed instruments of which class the serpent seems to be the natural bass; but this is also, we think, to be greatly regretted. Who could listen to the exquisite tone and the neatness and rapidity of execution which characterise Mr. Pollard's performances without feeling that a fine instrument of great compass, power, and expression had become almost obsolete in this neighbourhood. Indeed, we believe it is a fact, that two good clarionet players for orchestral performances can hardly be found in Yorkshire.
Another thing which struck us in so large a band, containing corpopean, horn, and trombone-players of the highest class, was the absence of the trumpet. Herein we think Mr. Godfrey at fault, for the trumpet is alone as an instrument, and though it may be pleaded that it is not so useful for general purposes as the cornopean, yet the real trumpet effect cannot be produced on any other instrument; and we think Mr. Godfrey would do wisely to add a couple to his otherwise most excellent band.


That part article reveals the workings of Charles Godfrey (instrumentation-wise) in 1854...with the euphonium replacing the ophicleide....his use of the serpent as a natural bass to the woodwind long after most other bands had consigned it to history....and the absence of the trumpet in favour of the cornet for all parts. It must have been around this period that amateur bands in Yorkshire became 'brass only'....as the paper's newshound appears to be lamenting the disappearance of 'clarionets' in these bands.


J.G.
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COLDSTREAM PERSONAL TRANSPORT.

Postby johngleeson » Tue Jul 23, 2013 12:06 pm

COLDSTREAM MUSICIANS' PERSONAL TRANSPORT: 1866-STYLE.


Do you remember attending FMB at the Dukes in days of old? Some of us arrived by Tube....some by bike or on foot....and some by car. I don't seem to recall anybody arriving by horse though. Before I found this next snippet it never occurred to me how our band ancestors got about when not in London...but this next find from the 'Sussex Advertiser' of 28th August 1866 reveals how at least one of our number perambulated when not in the metropolis. Here's the find:


SUSSEX -LEWES.

ACCIDENT. - On Thursday morning a member of the Coldstream Guards' band was riding on horseback in North-street, when his horse was frightened by the barking of some dog and galloped up into Market-street, when the leg of the unfortunate rider came into contact with the wheel of a waggon, and he was brought to the ground. He was taken into a shop close by, where he was seen by Dr. Smythe, who found that his patient, although he had no bones broken, was rather severely hurt in the back and knee. He was well enough, however, to leave the town the same evening.


Unfortunately it didn't reveal this Coldstream musician's name. Whoever it was he was well off enough to either own or hire a horse to get about Sussex and its environs. If any ex-band members live around the Lewes area....the next time you in that town....have a walk along North Street and go into Market Street....and try to imagine one of our band ancestors holding on to a spooked nag for grim death as it careered up these thoroughfares....only to end up colliding with a wagon...twatting his knee on a cartwheel....and ending up on his arse in Market Street.


J.G.
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Re: MORE ON THE BAND'S 'TURKISH MUSIC'.

Postby johngleeson » Thu Aug 01, 2013 11:27 am

johngleeson wrote:MORE ON THE BAND'S 'TURKISH MUSIC' (1799).


Found this article in the 'Newcastle Courant' of January 12th, 1799 which directly confirms that our band's 'Turkish Music' percussionists hired themselves out to teach 'society ladies' the mystic art of playing the tambourine and cymbals allied to the associated 'moves' and 'poses'. Here it is :-


NEWCASTLE COURANT JANUARY 12TH 1799.

" Fashionable caprice has found out another novelty necessary to the complete accomplishment of the female character; it is no other than that all women of taste should scientifically be taught the use of those delicate instruments called cymbals. The Duke of York's military blacks are the personages from whom lessons are received; and it is now the height of fashion for a lady to be able to accompany the dances of an evening with the clangour of the soul-inspiring cymbals."


To back the above newspaper article up i've found a print entitled " Savoyards of Fashion - or the musical mania of 1799 " . It's one of those satirical cartoons that were popular in the Georgian era - and shows four 'society ladies' playing the tambourine, triangle, and cymbals. Given the above evidence we can now say this peculiar fashion must have peaked at around the 1799-mark.....and it was our band that provided the tutors for it.


J.G.


MORE ON "PRIVATE TUITION" (1817).


The above article, posted on page 135 of this topic, revealed the strange-but-true circumstance of the 'Turkish Music Craze' towards the close of the 18th century....when our band's percussive ancestors gave lessons to society 'It-Girls' in the mysterious art that was Turkish Music. Further proof of this tutorial phenomenon is found within the next find, which takes the form of a letter to the Editor of the Morning Post, London dating to the 20th December 1817. The letter was on the merits of a new music teaching method called 'Logierian Teaching'...here it is:


TO THE EDITOR OF THE MORNING POST.

NEW SYSTEM OF MUSICAL EDUCATION.

LOGIERIAN TEACHING.

My Master [piano teacher] says that the Logierian method of teaching reminds him of a curious circumstance which occurred a few years ago. He gave instruction to four young Ladies in one family, whose father was a Gentleman of taste, but their Mamma did all in her power to undo all that my Master did, by insisting on her daughters' training to play, what was at that time considered fashionable, the tambourine, the triangle, the cymbals, and the castanets; one day he [the Master] went at the usual hour, and found a tall Black man belonging to the Guards, surrounded by his pupils; the Lady of the house begged that the young damsels would perform a march, that my Master might see what great progress they had made - Blackee cried " Attention! - now (singing) Trum. Trum, de trum clank, clank, e clank - tink, tink, a tink - tick tack! " My Master of course was highly delighted, and bestowed on their performance all the praise it deserved; but fancy his surprise, when he was desired by my Lady to change his days of attendance to accommodate the sable master!

Pardon my intruding so much on your time, and believe me to be,

Yours respectfully,

A Bellows Blower. December 17.


If nothing else the above anecdote confirms just how popular these percussive lessons were. Those ex-band members must have been coining it in giving such lessons across areas of St. James's, Westminster, and Mayfair around the year 1800.


J.G.
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A.F. GODFREY'S LAST ADDRESS (1882).

Postby johngleeson » Fri Aug 09, 2013 3:05 pm

A.F. GODFREY'S LAST LONDON ADDRESS (1882).


Found the last address of Coldstream Bandmaster Adolphus 'Fred' Godfrey (1837-1882). He left the band in 1880 with some unidentified medical condition that affected his nervous system, and he died some two years later in 1882. Here's the short death notice that gives his last-known address. It was found in the 'Hampshire Telegraph' of 2nd September 1882:


GODFREY. - On the 28th ult., Adolphus Frederick Godfrey, late Bandmaster Coldstream Guards, of No. 3 Bridge-avenue, W.


So that was the one-liner. Bridge Avenue is located in the W6 district of London. You can still view it on 'Google Maps'...where it appears to be a rather nice large Victorian terraced villa, located just of Hammersmith Broadway and close to the Hammersmith Flyover. Average house price now: approx. £900,000 (I wonder what 'Fred' would think of that?) His father Charles and brothers Dan and Charles junior are interred at Brompton Cemetery...but 'Fred' isn't. Seeing this was his last address...I wonder if his last resting place is close by? If so, then the favourite location would have to be Margravine Cemetery (sometimes referred to as Hammersmith Old). Its more or less at the back of 'Queen's Club', where the lawn tennis is played every year just before Wimbledon.


J.G.
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ALFRED JOSEPH MOSS (1942).

Postby johngleeson » Fri Aug 09, 2013 3:22 pm

johngleeson wrote:THE COLDSTREAM BAND PERSONNEL THAT PLAYED AT THE NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR (1939).


I managed to unearth the passenger list for the " Aquitania " liner that brought our band back from the New York World's Fair in 1939. Unfortunately, the typed out list is very badly faded (wouldn't you know it)....so I made a best attempt to decipher it. My apologies if I have missed any names out or spelled them incorrectly. Each band member's age is given in the brackets. So here goes :-


SOUTHAMPTON 6TH JUNE, 1939. CUNARD WHITE STAR LINER AQUITANIA 20,800 TONS.

H.M. COLDSTREAM GUARDS' BAND WELLINGTON BARRACKS.

James C. Windram (53) Address: Staff Officer's Quarters, Regent's Park.

Olive Windram (53).

GUARDS' MUSICIANS.

Joseph Armitage (26).

Charles Bailey (28).

James L. Bashford (32)

William F. Bellwood (36).

James Baldwin (38).

George Carr (36).

John H. Cosker (33).

Ernest G. Dalwood (27).

Alfred V. Donald (27).

Leonard J. Davis (35).

Herbert H. Davis ( 33).

Albert H. Drake (21).

Alfred J. Ellory (15).

Henry P. Evans (22).

Evan Evans (33).

James Fergus (29).

Albert J. Gay (33).

Edward G. Garwood (39).

Antoine G. Gache (28).

Jack Grivelle (30).

Lionel M. Goring (29).

John Hiam (43).

Gerald Harling (36).

Charles Hart (39).

Leslie B. Harris (31).

Eric A. Hoare (24).

Andrew Hewlett (33).

Joseph Hume (61).

Henry E. Kent (29).

Hebert Kent (31).

Edward Kinsman (30).

Frederick Laycock (36).

Alexander Lewis (35).

Harry F. Lockwood (32).

Albert H. Moore (23).

Alfred J. Moss (22).

Claude Mortimore (36).

Albert Mills (22).

George A. Mills (27).

Lionel V. Marks (27).

Edward Neil (36).

Arthur A. Parrett (24).

William F. Power (36).

Harry Petts (23).

Robert H. Purchase (30).

George F. Pritchard (43).

Reginald F. Read (36).

Horace W. Russell (39).

Richard H. Scrogg (29).

John A. Smith (21).

Charles R. Sargent (36).

Edward Sellers (23).

Ralph Shorten (35).

John Scott (39).

Stanley Wales (39).

James A. Whitworth (32).

Stanley W. Ware (33).

Cuthbert E. Wilkinson (26).

Frederick G. Yeo (28).


I think that totals 59 +1. The youngest to travel was flute and piccolo Jack Ellory, aged just 15 years old. The oldest,at an incredible 61 and still playing in the band was Joseph Hume, who eventually left the band in 1943 aged almost 65. It's unusual to see Duggie Drake's name down as Albert H. Drake. I'm sure some of those musicians would have gone through W.W.2 and would have still been in the band in the 1950's...as I seem to recall Jim Fergus' name being mentioned in other posts dating to that decade. Do any of the other names ( transcription errors notwithstanding ) ring any bells ?


J.G.


COLDSTREAM BAND MEMBER ALFRED JOSEPH MOSS (1942).


The above article was posted back on page 123 of this topic. There are some 60 members of the band noted on this list, and looking at it sometimes makes you wonder what happened to these players. Some we do know about, for they were killed or injured in the Guards' Chapel some five years after this list was made...whilst others seem to have disappeared into band history. If you track this list down you eventually arrive at an 'Alfred J. Moss'. I unearthed an article on this ex-Coldstream musician dating to 1942. Here it is, as found in the Evening Telegraph (London) of 2nd October:


THIRTY YEAR RECORD MARRED.

L-Sgt. Joseph Moss, of Pathfield Road, Streatham, London, a member of the Coldstream Guards' band, who was charged at a Chelsea court-martial on August 14 with stealing six Army blankets, has been found guilty and sentenced to be reduced to the ranks. Moss at the court-martial said that the blankets had been left lying about after a raid, and there was nothing to indicate they were private property. He would complete 30 years' service in September, and had never been brought before his Commanding Officer or been the subject of a charge.


A bit harsh for a first offence, you would have thought, for liberating " Blankets: Army Man's: Hairy: Six for the Use Of " (perhaps they were more Draconian during wartime). I wonder if those blankets were rescued from the Duke of York's H.Q.... as the band would have been there during W.W.2?


J.G.
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Re: YOU DON'T SAY!

Postby damstirpitz » Fri Aug 09, 2013 4:26 pm

At a quick look those killed in the chapel June 1944 were on this US tour 1939, Charles Hart's grave I have visited at the Brompton Cemetery at the back of the Chelsea Football ground.

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Re: YOU DON'T SAY!

Postby BobLomas » Sat Aug 10, 2013 10:56 pm

I notice Joseph Hume (61) was there different age limits in the Military at this time?

I also think age limits are about to be raised if they have not been so already.
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